globe
This list relates to the 2016-17 which ended on 31/07/2017
  1. Core/General Texts 13 items
    This course covers an array of topics. As such there is no single core text. However there are several texts that we shall visit and revisit during the course. Some of these are found below. The books marked with * are recommended as core texts. Other texts are for general reading.
    1. Critical security methods: new frameworks for analysis - Claudia Aradau, Jef Huysmans, Andrew W. Neal, Nadine Voelkner 2015

      Book  Available in Library and as an e-book.

    2. Contesting security: strategies and logics - Thierry Balzacq 2015

      Book Essential Available in Library and as an e-book.

    3. The evolution of international security studies - Barry Buzan, Lene Hansen 2009

      Book Essential Available in Library and as an e-book.

    4. Security unbound: enacting democratic limits - Jef Huysmans 2014

      Book  Available in Library and as an e-book.

    5. Writings on cities - Henri Lefebvre, Eleonore Kofman, Elizabeth Lebas 1996

      Book 

    6. Critical security studies: an introduction - Columba Peoples, Nick Vaughan-Williams 2015

      Book Essential Available in Library and as an e-book.

    7. The spatial turn: interdisciplinary perspectives - Barney Warf, Santa Arias 2009 (electronic book)

      Book 

  2. Overview of Weekly Readings: 194 items
    The literature relevant to most seminars is vast. It is essential to read items marked with a pink asterisk*BEFORE any given week in order to gain sufficient insight into the core issues. Reading prior to seminars is also necessary so that students can discuss a given topic in depth during class and critically engage with the topics covered. The other items that are listed for each weekly topic only represent a small selection of possible texts. Some of them additional readings will overlap and develop the arguments being advanced in the core texts, while others develop extra lines of inquiry. Thus it may not be necessary to read every single reading, or at least not to read all of them in the same depth. However, it is strongly encouraged that students read broadly to have a richer set of insights and sources when it comes to writing their essays and preparing for exams.
    1. Seminar 1: The Copenhagen School and (de)securitization 9 items
      Questions: 1. What are the core strengths of The Copenhagen School’s securitization framework? 2. Do you believe that speaking security ‘does something’? 3. Why is desecuritization presented as the ultimate ideal by the Copenhagen School? 4. What role do audiences play in (de)securitizing issues?
      1. Readings: 9 items
        1. Security, resilience and desecuritization: multidirectional moves and dynamics - Philippe Bourbeau, Juha A. Vuori 2015

          Article  Digitised.

        2. Security: a new framework for analysis - Barry Buzan, Ole Wæver, Jaap de Wilde 1998

          Book Essential

        3. What kind of theory - if any - is securitization? - T. Balzacq, S. Guzzini, M. C. Williams, O. Waever 2015

          Article Essential

        4. Securitization and Desecuritization - Ole Wæver 1995

          Chapter Essential

    2. Seminar 2: Securitization and its critics 25 items
      Questions: 1. Identify and unpack three major criticisms levelled against the Copenhagen School’s securitization framework. 2. Are there any weakness that you feel still have not been addressed by ‘second generation’ scholars? 3. What happens when we adopt a more ‘sociological approach’ to securitization? 4. How do you want to speak security?
      1. Readings: 25 items
        1. Contesting security: strategies and logics - Thierry Balzacq 2015

          Book  Available in Library and as an e-book.

        2. ‘Securitization’ revisited: theory and cases - Thierry Balzacq, Sarah Léonard, Jan Ruzicka 2016

          Article Essential

        3. The West: a securitising community? - Gunther Hellmann, Benjamin Herborth, Gabi Schlag, Christian Weber 2013

          Article 

    3. Seminar 3: Spaces of Securitization 28 items
      Questions: 1. The relationship between securitization and space is complex. Discuss. 2. Why is it important to introduce the spatial turn to securitization studies? 3. In which spaces do you feel that securitization takes place, fails, succeeds or transforms? Why? 4. How do everyday spaces and places play a role in processes of (de)securitization?
      1. Readings: 28 items
        1. Foreward - John R. Stilgoe 1994

          Chapter 

        2. Security and everyday life - Vida Bajc, Willem De Lint 2011

          Book 

        3. Invisible cities - Italo Calvino, William Weaver 1997

          Book 

        4. The practice of everyday life - Michel de Certeau 1984

          Book 

        5. The Mundane Matters - Cynthia Enloe 2011

          Article Essential

        6. The war on teenage terrorists - Vanessa A. Massaro, Emma Gaalaas Mullaney 2011

          Article Essential

        7. Place and placelessness - Edward Relph 1976

          Book 

        8. The spatial turn: interdisciplinary perspectives - Barney Warf, Santa Arias 2009 (electronic book)

          Book 

    4. Seminar 4: Outer space 15 items
      Questions: 1. Where do the spatial boundaries of outer space being and end? 2. Can (de)securitization occur in outer space? If yes, how? 3. Can we ever fully secure outer space? 4. Can we encounter the everyday in outer space? 5. How do you envision the relationship between securitization and this type of space?
      1. Readings: 15 items
        1. Planet Politics: A Manifesto from the End of IR - Anthony Burke, Stefanie Fishel, Audra Mitchell, Simon Dalby 2016

          Article 

    5. Seminar 5: Cyber space 26 items
      Questions: 1. Where do the spatial boundaries of cyber space being and end? 2. Can (de)securitization occur in cyber space? If yes, how? 3. Can we ever fully secure cyber space? 4. Can we encounter the everyday in cyber space? 5. How do you envision the relationship between securitization and this type of space?
      1. Readings: 26 items
        1. A theory of actor-network for cyber-security - Thierry Balzacq, Myriam Dunn Cavelty 2016

          Article Essential

        2. After Snowden: Rethinking the Impact of Surveillance - Zygmunt Bauman, Didier Bigo, Paulo Esteves, Elspeth Guild 2014

          Article 

        3. Who controls the Internet?: illusions of a borderless world - Jack L. Goldsmith, Tim Wu 2008

          Book  Available in Library and as an e-book.

        4. An INS Special Forum: Implications of the Snowden Leaks - Loch K. Johnson, Richard J. Aldrich, Christopher Moran, David M. Barrett 2014

          Article 

    6. Seminar 6: Airports 15 items
      Questions: 1. Where do the spatial boundaries of airports being and end? 2. Can (de)securitization occur in airports? If yes, how? 3. Can we ever fully secure airports? 4. Can we encounter the everyday in airports? 5. How do you envision the relationship between securitization and this type of space?
      1. Readings: 15 items
        1. Passport Photos - Mark B. Salter 2015

          Chapter 

        2. No Joking! - Mark B. Salter 2011

          Chapter 

        3. Electronic Passports - William Walters, Daniel Vanderlip 2015

          Chapter 

    7. Seminar 7: Borders 24 items
      Questions: 1. Where do the spatial boundaries of borders being and end? 2. Can (de)securitization occur at borders? If yes, how? 3. Can we ever fully secure borders? 4. Can we encounter the everyday at borders? 5. How do you envision the relationship between securitization and this type of space?
      1. Readings: 24 items
    8. Seminar 8: Streets 20 items
      Questions: 1. Where do the spatial boundaries of streets being and end? 2. Can (de)securitization occur in streets? If yes, how? 3. Can we ever fully secure streets? 4. Can we encounter the everyday in streets? 5. How do you envision the relationship between securitization and this type of space?
      1. Readings: 20 items
        1. Dirty writing - Alison Pullen, Carl Rhodes 2008

          Article 

        2. Street Politics - Michael J. Shapiro 2012

          Article Essential

        3. The time of the city - Michael J. Shapiro 2010

          Book 

        4. Urbanizing the security agenda - Gerda R. Wekerle, Paul S. B. Jackson 2005

          Article Essential

    9. Seminar 9: Museums 17 items
      Questions: 1. Where do the spatial boundaries of museums being and end? 2. Can (de)securitization occur in museums? If yes, how? 3. Can we ever fully secure museums? 4. Can we encounter the everyday in museums? 5. How do you envision the relationship between securitization and this type of space?
      1. Readings: 17 items
        1. Aesthetics and world politics - Roland Bleiker 2009

          Book  Available in Library and as an e-book.

        2. Museum studies: an anthology of contexts - Bettina Messias Carbonell 2012

          Book 

        3. Art/museums: international relations where we least expect it - Christine Sylvester 2009

          Book  Chapter 1 has been digitised.

    10. Seminar 10: My Space & Ethnography 14 items
      Questions: 1. Where do the spatial boundaries of your ‘my’ space being and end? 2. Can (de)securitization occur in this ‘my’ space? If yes, how? 3. Can we ever fully secure ‘my’ space? 4. Can we encounter the everyday in ‘my’ space? 5. How do you envision the relationship between securitization, ethnography and this type of space?
      1. Readings: 14 items
        1. The ethics of autoethnography - Elizabeth Dauphinee 2010

          Article Essential

        2. Is all ‘I’ IR? - Sarah Naumes 2015

          Article Essential

    11. Seminar 11 1 item
      1. Revision if requested.

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