globe
  1. Compulsory items for purchase: 2 items
    1. The Iliad of Homer - trans. Richmond A. Lattimore 2011

      Book Essential

  2. WEEK 1: Introduction and Iliad book 1 6 items
    1. First Hour: Orientation and Introductory Lecture: 1 item
      1. 'Fame, Tradition and Narrative: key themes and advice for studying the Iliad.'

    2. Second Hour: Group Work 5 items
      1. Read Iliad book 1 and the secondary reading for your group and make notes on the following questions:


        Achilles group:
        is Agamemnon wholly or solely in the wrong in this book? (refer to specific evidence from the text)

        Briseis group: How does the narrator establish his authority to tell this tale in book 1? What aspects of its style and presentation suggest that this poem stems from an oral tradition and is designed for live performance? (refer to specific examples).

        Chryses group: What is the relationship between the quarrel between Agamemnon and Achilles and the subsequent scene on Olympus? What does this divine scene add?  

      2. Secondary Reading: 4 items
        1. Homer's Iliad: a commentary on three translations - Peter V. Jones 2003

          Book  pp. 11-43, 45-64 (all groups)

        2. Affronts and Quarrels - D. Cairns

          Chapter  (Achilles group)

        3. The mortal hero: an introduction to Homer's Iliad - Seth L. Schein 1984

          Book  Chapter 1 (Briseis group)

        4. Manhood and Heroism - M. Clarke

          Chapter  Esp. pp. 74-86 (Chryses group) [Available in the library and as an e-book.]

  3. WEEK 2: Iliad book 2 / the use of similes 26 items
    1. First Hour:  Group Work

    2. Achilles group 3 items
      Read 2.1-393. How are we to view Agamemnon’s ‘trial’ of the men here? Does it make sense? What do we learn of Agamemnon’s and Odysseus’ character and roles?
      1. Secondary Reading: 3 items
        1. "The City-Sacker Odysseus" in Iliad 2 and 10 - Adele J. Haft 1990

          Article  Just read pp. 37-45. (Article contains Greek but line numbers match Lattimore exactly.)

    3. Briseis group: 3 items
      Read 2.207-393. Why do you think Thersites gets to be in the Iliad? What does this scene tell us about the world of the Greek heroes and the role of speech-making in the poem?
      1. Secondary Reading: 3 items
    4. Chryses group: 5 items
      Read 2.484-877 and note maps in Lattimore, pp. 69-72. What can the ‘Catalogue of Ships’ and ‘catalogue of Trojan contingents’ tell us about how the Iliad was composed and the poem’s narrative technique. What does the catalogue of ships – and the way in which it is introduced - do for the narrator’s status and does it ‘fit’ with the rest of the poem?
      1. Secondary Reading: 5 items
        1. Catalogue of Ships - O. Dickinson

          Article  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        2. The Iliad: a commentary, Vol. 1: Books 1-4 - G. S. Kirk 1985

          Book  pp. 168-189 [Very detailed and not a priority for the class]

        3. The Trojan Catalogue - I. Rutherford

          Article  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        4. Catalogues - E. Minchin

          Article  Available in the library and as an e-book.

    5. Second Hour: Presentations and Discussion: the use of similes

    6. Presentation 1: 6 items
      Look at the unique series of similes at 2.455-83. Discuss their coherence and possible functions.
      1. Secondary Reading: 6 items
        1. Similes and other likenesses - R. Buxton

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        2. The Iliad: a commentary, Vol. 5: Books 17-20 - Mark W. Edwards, G. S. Kirk 1991

          Book  pp. 24-91

        3. Similes - M. Edwards

          Article  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        4. Similes in the Homeric poems - Carroll Moulton 1977

          Book 

    7. Presentation 2: 7 items
      Look at the following similes in their context and discuss their impact: 8.555-561; 11.556-63; 20.495-7, 18.600-1, 3.33-5, 16.6-10. What sorts of poetic and narrative function do the poem’s similes have?
      1. Secondary Reading: 7 items
        1. Similes and other likenesses - R. Buxton

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        2. The Iliad: a commentary, Vol. 5: Books 17-20 - Mark W. Edwards, G. S. Kirk 1991

          Book  pp. 24-91

        3. Similes - M Edwards

          Article  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        4. Homer on life and death - Jasper Griffin 1980

          Book  [Use index]

        5. Character, narrator, and simile in the Iliad - Jonathan L. Ready 2011

          Book  [Use index]

  4. WEEK 3: Iliad 3-7 / gender and heroism, Greeks and Trojans 23 items
    1. First Hour: Group Work

    2. Achilles group 3 items
      Read all of Book 3. How far are the Trojan characters in this book represented negatively? How is Helen represented and used in this book?
      1. Secondary Reading: 3 items
        1. Homer's Iliad: a commentary on three translations - Peter V. Jones 2003

          Book  pp. 83-93, 325-7

        2. Homer: poet of the Iliad - Mark W. Edwards 1987

          Book  pp 188-97

    3. Briseis group: 5 items
      Read Books 4-5. What is the tone and function of Agamemnon’s ‘review’ of the men at 4.220-421? What narrative and thematic functions are served by Diomedes’ aristeia in book 5 and the entry of Hector into the battle?
      1. Secondary Reading: 5 items
        1. Diomedes - O. Anderson

          Article  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        2. Aphrodite - B. Currie

          Article  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        3. Dione - O. Lyons

          Article  Available in the library and as an e-book.

    4. Chryses group: 3 items
      Focus on the meeting of Glaucus and Diomedes at 6.119-236 and the duel between Hector and Ajax at 7.1-321 What do these episodes tell us about heroic ‘values’ and how enemies interact in the Iliad?
      1. Secondary Reading 3 items
        1. Iliad, book VI - Barbara Graziosi, Johannes Haubold 2010

          Book  pp. 34-40

    5. Second Hour: Presentations and Discussion: Book 6 – Hector and the women of Troy.

    6. Presentation 1: 5 items
      What do we learn about Hector and his priorities through his encounter with Helen, Hecabe and Andromache in Book 6?
      1. Secondary Reading 5 items
        1. Gender and Homeric Epic - N. Felson, L. M. Slatkin

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        2. Iliad, book VI - Barbara Graziosi, Johannes Haubold 2010

          Book  pp. 40-47

    7. Presentation 2: 5 items
      What is Andromache’s role in Book 6 and how might an original archaic or classical audience have viewed her words and actions?
      1. Secondary Reading 5 items
        1. Gender and Homeric Epic - N. Felson, L.M. Slatkin

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        2. Iliad, book VI - Barbara Graziosi, Johannes Haubold 2010

          Book  pp. 40-56

  5. WEEK 4 Iliad 8-12 / The Embassy to Achilles and the Character of Achilles 24 items
    1. First Hour: Group Work

    2. Achilles group 3 items
      Read Book 10 (the so-called Doloneia). It has been argued that this book was a later addition to the Iliad and is surplus to requirements. Do you agree with this? Jones calls the opening ‘dull’ and the attack on Rhesus ‘crude and unheroic’: is this fair?
      1. Secondary Reading: 3 items
        1. Iliad 10 and the poetics of ambush: a multitext edition with essays and commentary - Casey Dué, Mary Ebbott 2010

          Book  Esp. Chapter 1. [An external online edition is available via the 'online resource' link. ]

    3. Briseis group: 4 items
      Read Book 11, focusing on lines 598-848. What is the significance of these scenes for the rest of the poem? What is the paradigmatic force of Nestor’s big speech to Patroclus?
      1. Secondary Reading: 4 items
        1. Homeric soundings: the shaping of the Iliad - Oliver Taplin 1992

          Book  pp. 155-177

    4. Chryses group: 4 items
      Read Book 12. What is the significance of lines 1-35 on the Greeks’ wall? How does the wall develop the battle narrative? What is the significance of the exchange between Hector and Polydamas (175-250) and between Glaucus and Sarpedon (251-330)?
      1. Secondary Reading: 4 items
        1. Homer's Trojan theater: space, vision, and memory in the Iliad - Jenny Strauss Clay 2011

          Book  pp. 56-68 [ Available in the library and as an e-book]

        2. Manhood and Heroism - M. Clarke

          Chapter  [Available in the library and as an e-book.]

    5. Second Hour: Presentations and Discussion: The Embassy to Achilles and the Character of Achilles

    6. Presentation 1: 6 items
      How does the embassy episode in Book 9 deepen the poem’s portrayal of Achilles? Does he reject an ‘heroic code’?
      1. The language of heroes: speech and performance in the Iliad - Richard P. Martin 1989

        Book  Chapter 5. [An external online edition is available via the 'online resource' link]

      2. The Language of Achilles - M. D. Reeve 1973

        Article  [You can match the Greek to Lattimore via line numbers]

    7. Presentation 2: What is the role of Phoenix in book 9? 5 items
      1. Secondary Reading: 5 items
        1. Iliad, Book nine - Jasper Griffin, Homer 1995

          Book 

  6. WEEK 5: Books 13-17 / The ‘Homeric Question’/ repetition and orality 28 items
    1. First Hour: Group Work

    2. Achilles group 3 items
      Read books 13-15. Here we have an ebb and flow of fighting between Trojans and Greeks, culminating in the Trojans’ ascendancy as they press close to the Greeks’ ships. How does ‘Homer’ shape the narrative here? What are the most vivid and entertaining episodes or descriptions in these books and what function to they serve?
      1. Secondary Reading: 3 items
        1. Homer's Trojan theater: space, vision, and memory in the Iliad - Jenny Strauss Clay 2011

          Book  pp. 68-86 [Available in the library and as an e-book]

        2. The Iliad: a commentary, Vol. 4: Books 13-16 - Richard Janko, G. S. Kirk 1992

          Book  [e.g. pp. 168–207 on 14.153-353]

    3. Briseis group: 4 items
      Read books 16-17. What aspects of these books create a sense of pathos and tragedy concerning the death of Patroclus? Does it make sense to use the term ‘tragedy’ in the context of Homeric epic
      1. Secondary Reading: 4 items
        1. Tragic Form and Feeling in the Iliad - R. B. Rutherford 1982

          Article  [Original with Greek not translated version of this article.]

    4. Chryses group: 2 items
      Read book 16 and list one example of each type of narrative feature which you think might relate to the epic’s ‘oral-derived’ status. Which of these features enhance the the power of the narrative? 16.419-683: discuss the significance of the death of Sarpedon and its handling by Homer
      1. Secondary Reading: 2 items
        1. Homer's Iliad: a commentary on three translations - Peter V. Jones 2003

          Book  pp. 11-23, 32-43, 222-237

        2. The mortal hero: an introduction to Homer's Iliad - Seth L. Schein 1984

          Book  Esp. chapter 2

    5. Second Hour: Presentations and Discussion: The Homeric Question / Repetition, tradition and Orality

    6. Presentation 1: 11 items
      What is the ‘Homeric Question’? What do we do with the arguments for ‘oral composition’ advanced in various ways over the years?
      1. Secondary Reading: 11 items
        1. Homer's Iliad: a commentary on three translations - Peter V. Jones 2003

          Book  pp.11-23, 32-43.

        2. The Homeric Question - R. Fowler

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        3. Unitarians - M. L. West

          Article  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        4. Analysts - M. L. West

          Article  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        5. Neoanalysis - M. Edwards

          Article  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        6. Speeches - M. L. Finkelberg

          Article  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        7. Doloneia - M. Alden

          Article  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        8. Homeric Question - M. L. West

          Article  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        9. Oral-Formulaic Theory - D. Elmer

          Article  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        10. Homeric questions - Gregory Nagy 1996

          Book 

    7. Presentation 2: 6 items
      Do the ‘repetitive’, ’traditional’ and ‘oral-derived’ features of Homeric poetry require us to take a different approach to ‘literary criticism’ to Homer than that which we would take with an epic poem which is not ‘oral-derived’ (e.g. Apollonius’ Aronautica or Virgil’s Aeneid)?
      1. Secondary Reading: 6 items
        1. Homer's Iliad: a commentary on three translations - Peter V. Jones 2003

          Book  pp.11-23, 32-43

        2. The Homeric Question - R. Fowler

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        3. The Iliad: an unpredictable classic - D. Lateiner

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

  7. WEEK 6: Books 18-22 / The Shield of Achilles 22 items
    1. First Hour: Group Work

    2. Achilles group 3 items
      Read Book 18. 1-368 and Book 19. Critics have discussed these parts of the Iliad in terms of ‘turning points’ for the narrative. What sorts of turning points are there? What is the role of Thetis in Book 18?
      1. Secondary Reading: 3 items
        1. Homer's Iliad: a commentary on three translations - Peter V. Jones 2003

          Book  pp. 248-258 and 262-270

        2. The Wrath of Thetis - Laura M. Slatkin 1986

          Article  [Also in D. Cairns, Oxford Readings in Homer’s Iliad (Oxford 2001)]

    3. Briseis group: 3 items
      Read Books 20 and 21. In what ways, and how far, do these books establish Achilles’ credentials as a fighter and a warrior bent on revenge? Why do Aeneas and Achilles spend so long talking (or ‘flyting’) before fighting in book 20?
      1. Secondary Reading: 3 items
        1. Homer on life and death - Jasper Griffin 1980

          Book  [Use index]

    4. Chryses group: 3 items
      Chryses: Read Book 22. What poetic, narrative and thematic features of the actual duel between Hector and Achilles make it so effective?
      1. Secondary Reading: 3 items
        1. Iliad: Book XXII - Irene J. F. de Jong, Homer 2012

          Book  Introduction and use index

    5. Second Hour: Presentations and Discussion: The Shield of Achilles / Book 22

    6. Presentation 1: 5 items
      Read Book 18, but focus on lines 468-617. What is the significance of the scenes depicted on the shield of Achilles?
      1. Secondary Reading: 5 items
        1. The Shield of Achilles within the 'Iliad' - Oliver Taplin 1980

          Article  [Reprinted in D. Cairns (2001) Oxford Readings]

        2. The shield of Homer: narrative structure in the Iliad - Keith Stanley 1993

          Book  [use index: not actually all about the shield]

    7. Presentation 2: 6 items
      In what ways does Book 22 engage an audience’s sympathy for Hector and the Trojans?
      1. Homer on life and death - Jasper Griffin 1980

        Book  [Use index]

      2. Iliad: Book XXII - Irene J. F. de Jong, Homer 2012

        Book  [Introduction and use index]

  8. WEEK 7: Books 23-24 / Pathos, supplication and Tragedy 23 items
    1. First Hour: Group Work

    2. Achilles group: 3 items
      Read Book 23.1-257. How does this focus on Achilles, Patroclus’ ghost and threats to Hector’s body have a wider significance for the poem as a whole?
      1. Secondary Reading: 3 items
    3. Briseis group: 4 items
      Read the games at 23.257-897, focusing especially on 257-652. How and why does Homer detail these games (especially the chariot race and its aftermath) so extensively?
      1. Secondary Reading: 4 items
        1. The Iliad: a commentary, Vol.6: Books 21-24 - N. J. Richardson, G. S. Kirk 1993

          Book 

        2. Cunning intelligence in Greek culture and society - Marcel Detienne, Jean Pierre Vernant, Janet Lloyd 1978

          Book  chapter 1 [on the chariot race]

    4. Chryses group: 3 items
      Read Book 24.1-187. In what ways does this opening to the final book of the Iliad make it a fitting ending to the plot and themes of the Iliad?
      1. Secondary Reading: 3 items
        1. Homer's Iliad: a commentary on three translations - Peter V. Jones 2003

          Book  pp. 30-37 and pp. 309-323

        2. Iliad, book XXIV - C. W. Macleod 1982

          Book  pp. 8-35.

    5. SECOND HOUR: PRESENTATIONS AND DISCUSSION: Pathos, supplication and tragedy: the significance of Book 24.

    6. Presentation 1: 6 items
      In what ways does Book 24 exhibit what we would now call ‘tragic’ sensibilities?
      1. Secondary Reading: 6 items
        1. Homer's Iliad: a commentary on three translations - Peter V. Jones 2003

          Book  pp. 30-37 and pp. 309-323.

        2. Iliad, book XXIV - C. W. Macleod 1982

          Book  pp. 1-16.

        3. Tragic Form and Feeling in the Iliad - R. Rutherford 1982

          Article  Original article with Greek not translated .

    7. Presentation 2: 5 items
      Discuss the way in which Book 24 manipulates the motifs of supplication, lament and the treatment of corpses.
      1. Homer's Iliad: a commentary on three translations - Peter V. Jones 2003

        Book  pp. 30-37 and pp. 309-323.

      2. K. Crotty The Poetics of Supplication: Homer's Iliad and Odyssey (Ithaca 1994). On order

  9. WEEK 8: Historicity and ‘Homeric society’/ is there a polis in this text? / Gender roles 28 items
    1. FIRST HOUR: GROUP WORK

    2. Achilles group: 5 items
      In what sense might the Iliad represent an ‘historical’ society? What ‘contemporary meaning’ might it have had for its intended first audience?
      1. Secondary Reading: 5 items
        1. The Use and Abuse of Homer - Ian Morris 1986

          Article  [recommended: NB: reprinted in D. Cairns Oxford Readings in Homer’s Iliad (Oxford 2001)

        2. Homer’s Society - R. Osborne

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        3. Society, Homeric - K. Raaflaub

          Chapter  [recommended starting points. Note that Raafalub sees Homeric society as more ‘consistent’ and related to the (slightly earlier) real society of the poem’s first audiences than many scholars do] Available in the library and as an e-book.

        4. Historicity of Homer - K. Raaflaub

          Chapter  [recommended starting points. Note that Raafalub sees Homeric society as more ‘consistent’ and related to the (slightly earlier) real society of the poem’s first audiences than many scholars do] Available in the library and as an e-book.

    3. Briseis group: 4 items
      what is the significance of warfare for our interpretation of the Iliad’s relationship with Greek history?
      1. Secondary Reading: 4 items
        1. Greece in the making, 1200-479 BC - Robin Osborne 2009

          Book  Ch.5 [Available in the library and as an e-book.]

    4. Chryses group: 3 items
      what specific aspects of the Iliad make us sceptical that it can represent any ‘real society’ or single historical period? ). You could start by thinking about the boar’s tusk helmet at 10.261-5 and Ajax’s shield in book 7.
      1. Secondary Reading: 3 items
        1. Greece in the making, 1200-479 BC - Robin Osborne 2009

          Book  Ch.5 [Available in the library and as an e-book.]

    5. SECOND HOUR: PRESENTATION and DISCUSSION: is there a polis in this text?

    6. Presentation 1: 8 items
      Do the Iliad and Odyssey contain events, scenes, language or motifs which in some way point to the poems being ‘aware’ of the concept of the polis as a political community? Why is this question important?
      1. Secondary Reading: 8 items
        1. The world of Odysseus - M. I. Finley 1979

          Book  Other editions available in the library.

        2. The Use and Abuse of Homer - Ian Morris 1986

          Article  [recommended: NB: reprinted in D. Cairns Oxford Readings in Homer’s Iliad (Oxford 2001)]

        3. Homer’s Society - R. Osborne

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        4. Homeric Society - K. Raaflaub

          Chapter 

        5. Polis - K. Raaflaub

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        6. Society, Homeric - K. Raaflaub

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        7. Homer and the sacred city - Stephen Scully 1994

          Book  Read pp 1-15.

    7. Presentation 2: 6 items
      What does the Iliad have to say about gendered social roles and functions?
      1. Secondary Reading: 6 items
        1. Gender - L. E. Doherty

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        2. Manhood and Heroism - M. Clarke

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        3. Gender and Homeric Epic - N. Felson, L.M. Slatkin

          Chapter  [highly recommended] Available in the library and as an e-book.

        4. Women - D. Lyons

          Chapter  [good starting point] Available in the library and as an e-book.

  10. WEEK 9: Ethics and Values in Homeric Heroism: honour, shame, cooperation and competition 30 items
    1. FIRST HOUR: GROUP WORK

    2. Achilles group: 7 items
      what moral and social concepts drive the Homeric hero to be competitive? Think of some examples of competitive values and behaviour from the text.
      1. Secondary Reading: 7 items
        1. Homeric Values and Homeric Society - A. W. H. Adkins 1971

          Article  [discredited but still worth reading]

        2. Values - D. L. Cairns

          Chapter  [recommended starting point] Available in the library and as an e-book.

        3. Shame - D. L. Cairns

          Chapter  [recommended starting point] Available in the library and as an e-book.

        4. Honor - D.L. Cairns

          Chapter  [recommended starting point] Available in the library and as an e-book.

        5. Responsibility - C. Gill

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        6. Homeric morality - Naoko Yamagata 1994

          Book 

    3. Briseis group: 6 items
      what moral and social concepts drive the Homeric hero to be cooperative? Think of some examples of cooperative values and behaviour from the text.
      1. Secondary Reading: 6 items
        1. Values - D. L. Cairns

          Chapter  [recommended starting points] Available in the library and as an e-book.

        2. Shame - D. L. Cairns

          Chapter  [recommended starting points] Available in the library and as an e-book.

        3. Honor - D. L. Cairns

          Chapter  [recommended starting points] Available in the library and as an e-book.

        4. Euboulia in the Iliad - Malcolm Schofield 1986

          Article  [also in Cairns (ed.) Oxford Readings]

    4. Chryses group: 3 items
      in what ways does the concept and value of reciprocity underpin the Iliad?
      1. Secondary Reading: 3 items
        1. Reciprocity in ancient Greece 1998

          Book  [includes: G. Zanker ‘Beyond reciprocity: The Akhilleus-Priam scene in Iliad 24’, 73 –92, and N. Postlethwaite ‘Akhilleus and Agamemnon: generalized reciprocity’, 93-104]

    5. SECOND HOUR: PRESENTATIONS AND DISCUSSION

    6. Presentation 1: 7 items
      To what extent is ‘Homeric society’ a ‘shame culture’?
      1. Secondary Reading: 7 items
        1. Values - D. L. Cairns

          Chapter  [recommended starting points] Available in the library and as an e-book.

        2. Shame - D. L. Cainrs

          Chapter  [recommended starting points] Available in the library and as an e-book.

        3. Honor - D. L. Cairns

          Chapter  [recommended starting points] Available in the library and as an e-book.

    7. Presentation 2: 5 items
      ‘It is not true that its dominant values are agonistic and individualistic’ (Cairns 2001, p. 21). Can honour promote cooperative values in the Iliad?
      1. Secondary Reading: 5 items
        1. Conflict and Community in the Iliad - W. Allan, D. Cairns

          Chapter 

        2. Affronts and quarrels in the Iliad - D. L. Cairns

          Chapter  [recommended]

        3. Euboulia in the Iliad - Malcolm Schofield 1986

          Article  [also in Cairns (ed.) Oxford Readings]

        4. Homeric morality - Naoko Yamagata 1994

          Book 

  11. WEEK 10: The Gods and Fate: the ‘role’ of the gods / fate as tradition / fate and free will 30 items
    1. FIRST HOUR: GROUP WORK

    2. Achilles group: 4 items
      What do scenes on Olympus contribute to the poem’s atmosphere?
      1. Secondary Reading: 4 items
        1. Homer: the resonance of epic - Barbara Graziosi, Johannes Haubold 2005

          Book  especially chapter 3.

        2. Homer on life and death - Jasper Griffin 1980

          Book  esp. pp. 144-204

        3. The Gods in Homeric Epic - E. Kearns

          Chapter  [recommended] Available in the library and as an e-book.

    3. Briseis group: 5 items
      How important is Thetis for our understanding of the Iliad?
      1. Secondary Reading: 5 items
        1. The above article is also in:

        2. The Wrath of Thetis - L.M. Slatkin

          Chapter 

    4. Chryses group: 6 items
      What are the key modes of interaction between men and gods which the Iliad depicts? In what ways are these interactions important to the poem?
      1. Secondary Reading: 6 items
        1. Hiketeia - John Gould 1973

          Article  [a key study of supplication]

        2. The Gods in Homeric Epic - E. Kearns

          Chapter  [recommended] Available in the library and as an e-book.

        3. Prayer - D. Lateiner

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

    5. SECOND HOUR: PRESENTATIONS and DISCUSSION

    6. Presentation 1: 7 items
      Agamemnon blames Atê for his disastrous actions in Book 19. Use the case of Agamemnon to discuss the problems of free will and fate in the Iliad.
      1. Secondary Reading: 7 items
        1. Atê - D. Cairns

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        2. Responsibility - C. Gill

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        3. Double Motivation - H. Pelliccia

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

    7. Presentation 2: 6 items
      ‘Homer’s gods are very human and humanly intelligible’. In what senses is this true?
      1. Secondary Reading: 6 items
        1. Homer: the resonance of epic - Barbara Graziosi, Johannes Haubold 2005

          Book  especially chapter 3.

        2. Homer on life and death - Jasper Griffin 1980

          Book  esp. pp. 144-204

        3. The Gods in Homeric Epic - E. Kearns

          Chapter  [recommended] Available in the library and as an e-book.

        4. Homeric morality - Naoko Yamagata 1994

          Book  [See Part 1 on the gods’ (im)morality - highly recommended]

  12. WEEK 11: ‘Reception of the Iliad and Revision session 17 items
    1. FIRST HOUR: PRESENTATIONS AND DISCUSSION

    2. Presentation or group discussion: 9 items
      1. a) 'Logue is a major example of how modern receivers confront the unacceptable in Homer' (Hardwick 2004, p. 348).  Briefly illustrate and evaluate.

      2. Primary Reading: 6 items
        have a look at least one of Christopher Logue’s volumes of poetry based on the Iliad:
        1. See also some of this put together in one volume: 

        2. See Greenwood's appendix (below) for the detailed publication history and further relevant volumes

      3. Secondary Reading: 2 items
        1. Logue's Tele-Vision: Reading Homer from a Distance - E. Greenwood

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

    3. Presentation or group discussion: 2 items
      1. b) 'She has truly made, to borrow a phrase from Stephen Spender, a "miniature Iliad ", taut, fluid and graceful, its tones knelling like bells into the clear air, ringing out in remembrance of all the untimely dead' (Philip Womack in The Telegraph). What kind of 'reception' of the Iliad is Alice's Oswald's Memorial

      2. Primary Reading: 1 item
    4. Presentation or group discussion: 4 items
      1. c)  'In comparison with Sophocles, Petersen is downright modest in his modifications' (Ahl in Winkler (ed.) 2007, p.172). Briefly make a case for Troy (2006, Warner Bros) being adequate to its Homeric pedigree.

      2. Primary and secondary viewing/reading 3 items
        1. Troy: from Homer's Iliad to Hollywood epic - Martin M. Winkler 2007

          Book  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        2. Troy - (dir.) Wolfgang Petersen 2009 (dvd)

          Audio-visual document  • Try to look at the film itself (a copy will be available)

    5. SECOND HOUR: REVISION:

       

       We will discuss a past paper and techniques for answering the exam's comment and essay questions. We will also discuss revision techniques and the key themes of the course.

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